Grateful Dead WORKINGMAN'S DEAD (Numbered, Limited Edition, 180g Vinyl 45 RPM 2LP)

  • Sale
  • $ 49.98


Workingman’s Dead defies the erroneous belief that the Grateful Dead never attained brilliance in the recording studio. Forever prized for natural sonics, Workingman’s Dead attains audiophile reference status courtesy of this first-ever 45RPM version. As flawless as any rustic album ever released, the 1970 set now brims with soaring harmonies, organic execution, intertwined textures, and uncomplicated structures that furnish the songs a transcendence associated with timeless American music. Colorful, relatable characters seemingly torn from working-class histories and old-time fables inhabit the narratives.

The first Grateful Dead album to eschew cosmic jams and complex signatures, Workingman’s Dead stakes its existence to great songs, homespun warmth, and bare essentials. Its wistful, relaxed state—immediately apparent via the innocent album-opening invitation “Will you come with me?” on “Uncle John’s Band”—owes to the circumstances and conditions surrounding its creation. At the time, the Dead owed a considerable financial debt to Warner Bros. and were hobbled by a recent drug bust and financial scandal. Most significantly, the band was recovering from—and reacting to—the tragic events of the Altamont Music Festival and symbolic end of the peace and love era.

As such, Workingman’s Dead acts as a retreat from chaos and uncertainty, its songs emblems of simpler times and pleas for compassion in the face of hardship. Lyricist Robert Hunter said he aimed to capture the vintage elements of late 1940s country-and-western jukebox singles as well as old blues classics. In that vein, fare such as the Bakersfield-leaning “Cumberland Blues,” pastoral ballad “Dire Wolf,” and bluesy “Easy Wind” hit the mark. Leader Jerry Garcia’s occasional pedal-steel underpinnings arrive as a bonus.

Of course, aside from the economical concision and thematic consistency, the genius of Workingman’s Dead resides in the group’s expressive harmonies. Taught by Crosby, Stills and Nash, the Dead produce live “air blends” of multi-part vocal harmonies that provide the foundations of nearly every track. “Uncle John’s Band,” “High Time,” “New Speedway Boogie” (with the iconic refrain “One way or another/This darkness has got to give” referencing the ill wind that greeted the new decade), and the radio favorite “Casey Jones” practically float on the ensemble’s communal vocal beds.

AUTHORIZED DEALER - FULL WARRANTY
    1. "Uncle John’s Band"
    2. "High Time"
    3. "Dire Wolf"
    4. "New Speedway"
    5. "Cumberland Blues"
    6. "Black Peter"
    7. "Easy Wind"
    8. "Casey Jones"
      60-Day Money-Back Guarantee

      We want you to love every item you purchase from SKY by Gramophone. If you are not satisfied with your purchase, you may return items that are complete and like-new for any reason within 60 days. You may choose an exchange or a refund for the full amount of the items you purchased*. Refunds must be issued to the same credit card, debit card, gift certificate, or other form of payment used in the original transaction.

      SKY by Gamophone is an authorized dealer for all products we carry, which means manufacturer warranties are valid on every product purchased from us.

      *Restocking fees apply for furniture, as well as for products without original packaging, missing accessories, and not in new or like-new condition.

      FREE U.S. SHIPPING
      (TVs excluded)


      Sale

      Unavailable

      Sold Out